Sugi

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There is a huge tree in the Falkland Estate Arboretum, not far from the Monkey Puzzle tree near the Maspie Burn. I thought it was a Giant Redwood, one of those soft-barked punchable mega-trees from California. After the strong winds that brought down all the Monkey Puzzle leaves earlier this year, I found some green branches under the big tree, just enough to use for my tree project.

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Today I decided to check which Redwood the branches came from, knowing there’s more than one species. It turns out to be something else altogether, probably a Japanese Red Cedar, Cryptomeria japonica. It is related to the Giant Redwood Sequoiadendron giganteum but comes from the other side of the Pacific Ocean, yes, from Japan. There it is called Sugi and is highly-prized for its timber and precious ancient specimens. It can grow up to 70 metres (230 feet) tall and to a trunk diameter of 4 metres (13ft).

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I laid the twigs and leaves out to dry in the studio after collecting them. From the left: Hemlock(?), Lime, Monkey Puzzle leaves, Sugi, and one little twig from a neighbouring tree, possibly a Redwood. The Hemlock twigs (if that’s what they were) went brittle very quicky and ended up in the compost bin. The Sugi branches stayed flexible with a bit of soaking and made a very fragrant pair of baskets.

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See these and the other Tree Project baskets and pods at Open Studios North Fife from 29th April to 1st May at Centre for Stewardship Falkland

Tree projects

At the end of April I’m an invited artist at the Centre for Stewardship Falkland for this year’s Open Studios North Fife. My friend Tess Darwin is joining me, we’ll be based in the Stables Information Hub on Sat 29th April and in the Stables Craft Hub on Sun 30th and Mon 1st May. 

Over the winter we’ve both been working on personal projects inspired by the woodlands and plants of Falkland Estate and we are looking forward to showing some of our finished work. We’ll also be demonstrating how we use our materials and will be happy to talk about our processes – and all things woodland of course. Tess is a City and Guilds qualified textile artist and dedicated journal-keeper. I’m hoping she might bring some of her journals and experimental pieces with her, they are beautiful artworks in their own right.

Here are some examples of Tess’s work-in-progress…


My baskets/pods are dark and wintery in comparison. Between us I think we have four seasons!

            

I’m still working on some interesting construction challenges with those Monkey Puzzle leaves…


www.openstudiosfife.co.uk

Folk arts in Fife


At the end of January I started a new contract with the Fife Folk Museum in Ceres. I’m co-ordinating their Heritage Arts Hub activities over the next ten months, a programme funded by Young Start and the Robertson Trust. So I get to immerse myself in the Museum’s collection and work with its dedicated volunteer team and Trustees to invent events! Fab.

I’ve been visiting the Museum for many years and last year curated an exhibition with the Woolly Tree Gang, showcasing their project work since their origins in 2012. We did quite a bit of research in the Museum for the Living Lomonds Crafts of the Hills project in 2014 and the Gang made some lovely work inspired by the collection – including several rag-rugs. This theme continues, as Museum volunteers Sue and Alison found another five rag-rugs for me to look at on Monday.


I had a closer look at this ‘half-moon’ rug, a very shaggy, slightly wonky design containing lots of tartan fabric. The Museum record card describes it as ‘a “d” shaped rag rug for in front of the fire’, donated in 2003 by Jennie Simmons of Cambo. We’d love to know more. Did she make it? If not, who did? How old is it? What were the pieces of fabric before they were cut and hooked into the hessian? Old kilts? Ladies country-dancing skirts? 


Here are some close-ups:


We’ll carry on with the ‘fabric forensics’ and see what else we can find out. Offers of help welcome. 

I’m planning rag-rug related activities for later in the season, keep an eye on my blog, the Museum’s website and social media for information about these and other Heritage Arts Hub events. The Museum opens on 1st April, the Cafe is open all year, every day except Mondays.

www.fifefolkmuseum.org